Rampaging cop was fired for alleging excessive force

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/09/christopher-dorner-court-records-_n_2652289.html?utm_hp_ref=crime

Well, at least part of what he said was true.   The order of reports may or may not have been important- if his training officer was aware that he was arranging a meeting to report her she may have written him up as a pre-emptive strike.

Something about the official story seems off.  It may be that it was incomplete and that the missing bits are with the other troops in Bahrain.  If somebody can’t hack it I’d think that would come out in the military service.  Bahrain doesn’t appear in the news much but the officers there could have gotten inside his head. 

Overweight and non-white, they might have ridden him pretty hard.   Think Full Metal Jacket.

Extended emotional abuse can leave a person primed for later problems. 

I suppose this raises another issue, the cross integration of military and police personnel.

It sounds logical but it’s not.  It’s dangerous.

You do not want officers thinking like they are in a war zone and reacting like they are in a war zone.  Bad things can happen. 

You want cops to be at least a little inhibited in the use of their weapons.  You want a level of inhibition that would get people killed in a war zone because the cost-benefit picture changes.   A city is not a war zone.  You don’t want cops lighting the place up with gunfire just to make sure or because they thought they saw something.  You want them to be damn sure.

The skill sets are also different.

Or should be.

The primary tools of a police officer or security guard are presence and dialogue. 

Unfortunately the training will be heavier on how to shoot than on how to make problems go away.

I remember as a hospital guard that the philosophy of the hotheads was that there was never time for one person to spend five or ten minutes talking to someone but there was always time to have 5 or 6 guards spend half an hour restraining the person.  

I avoided calling for backup because I didn’t trust the judgment of the people I was working with. 

Half of them would engage in the scripted behavior of escalation and become part of the problem. 

Mood aggressors expect you to act and react in certain ways as part of the movie going on in their heads.  Depart from script and they can become confused and pliable.  Stay on script and you become the antagonist.

That doesn’t mean you back down.  It just means there is a big difference between discussing options, consequences, reality testing, and asking about what is going on for them, and actually caring, versus calling them a f-ing a——.

I never once had to call for stat backup.  The people who didn’t know how to behave were calling for stat backup every day, sometimes more than once.

I could go on and on about ways of handling people- another favorite being that people are constantly looking for cues about the nature and seriousness of a situation, so that you can control the behaviour of others by controlling your own- but I digress.

Soldiers working too soon after return as cops is a mistake. 

I’ve read about some of them shooting after departing vehicles in situations where that is just way over the top- but that is the training kicking in at an instinctive level.  It isn’t about blame.  It’s about wanting different things from soldiers and police officers.  Other than carrying arms they aren’t supposed to have a lot in common.

If a soldier is traumatized, either from war experience or from sadistic officers or other soldiers, he should go home to some nice, quiet, non-confrontational employment. 

If he’s got post-traumatic stress or other consequences that make him edgy, police work is going to be filled with triggers.

That can make them go all over the place.  They may go too far or be out of line one minute, then ashamed and crying the next.   They may be too up, then too down. 

Not the kind of rollercoaster you want a police officer on, especially if he’s having to relearn his job. 

 

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